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Nu- Stock

Discussion in 'Health & Nutrition' started by Mr. Brownstone, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    just got some in the mail for the first time. Do you guys dilute the stuff as the directions say you can with baby oil or just put it on full strength, also any good tips for application and or if you need to keep the dog outside after or if it just soaks in and they are good to go? I have done some reading and from what i can find it smells like shit!!!
     
  2. Chump

    Chump Banned

    Are you trying to get rid of mange?
     
  3. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    No i dont think so, he has seen the vet a number of times for this problem and we dont know what it is, no mange, no mites. We think it is a allergy? He gets red spots and the top layer of skin crusts up and flakes off and the hair goes with it. Starts out small between his hind legs goes up his belly then up his sides and then all over him. He is on Antibiotics and it helps for a while and then comes back even on them. I am using this just incase the vet has missed something in the skin scrapes and to just generally give him some relief and grow some hair back.
     
  4. rallyracer

    rallyracer CH Dog

    use full strength- apply w/ cotton swab or a gloved (latex/nitrile) hand
     
  5. Phillip

    Phillip Pup

    How old is your dog?

    I had the exact same thing on my dog. The Vet did tests, said possible allergies. Took it by the breeder, He told me it was Staff Infection and that they are prone to it while they develop immunities. My guy got it arond 12months - 15 months. I have NuStock and I don't think that will help for his. I was told by the breeder to rub the area with Stridex medicated pads couple times a day. That seemed to help a lot. He no longer has it btw. I was told it is similar for short haired dogs like acne is to teenagers.

    Would be curious to see what others have to say about what I wrote.
     
  6. Chump

    Chump Banned

    I would bet it is mange. Often times vets get multiple negative scrapes. I would treat w/ivermec.
     
  7. oldslowblue

    oldslowblue Big Dog

    full strength, do not dilute. Also include a benadryl capsule everyday to help fight this allergic reaction...

    ~blue
     
  8. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    Can you give dogs human Claratin.. for allergies. I ran into someone whom said they didd this and all the problems where solved. I had been giving him the benadryl while on antibiotics and it seemed to do nothing. He really does not itch or bite at it at all, all he really does is lick his paws.
     
  9. oldslowblue

    oldslowblue Big Dog

    NOT sure what kind of "IVERMEC" you're using, but it won't help in a case of mange or allergic reactions. It's actually only generally used in heartworm prevention...

    ~Blue
     
  10. scooter

    scooter Big Dog

    NU-Stock is the bomb. I am one of those weird folks that like the smell actually. I think it smells clean. I am a nurse. Go Figure.
    I bet you have a case of demodex and I would use it full strength. Twice a day. That stuff is wonderful and will grow hair back and cure tons of stuff. I would also dose him with Ivermectin, but be careful with it. some say it is dangerous to overmedicate, others say not so dangerous.
     
  11. oldslowblue

    oldslowblue Big Dog

    If you've been searching for the proper [COLOR=#0000cc !important][COLOR=#0000cc !important]canine[/COLOR][/COLOR] dosage of Claritin, there's good reason why you're having difficulty finding it. Find out why this medication is seldom used in treating dogs with allergies.

    Does your dog scratch, rub and chew his body until the skin is red and irritated? Does he have runny eyes or sneeze a lot? If he does, chances are high that he suffers from some type of allergy.
    Dogs can be allergic to almost anything, including:
    Whether the allergen is consumed or inhaled, the reaction triggered within the immune system more often than not surfaces in the skin. This is what dog owners have come to know as "itchy dog syndrome", but the proper name for the condition is "atopy", and it can wreak havoc on your pet.
    The reaction causes the immune system to produce a certain type of protein that automatically attaches itself to tissue mast cells in the skin. This in turn triggers a release of histamine, and it's this chemical that causes your dog to feel so itchy.
    When you have a surplus of histamine, you need an antihistamine to bring relief, and this brings us around to the question about the proper canine dosage of Claritin.

    There are several books on the market that offer information about converting human medications into canine doses. Although many dog owners have found these guides useful when treating dogs at home, there's always a certain amount of risk involved when administering drugs to your dog without your vet's supervision.
    Since there have been so many breakthroughs in treating allergies over the last several years, many of the current antihistamines are not included in these guides, and such is the case with Claritin. There are no canine conversion directions in print indicating the exact dosage of Claritin for dogs.
    So it follows that if you're determined to share your own allergy meds with your dog, the best thing you can do is run it by your vet first. If you find that your vet has had little experience using Claritin on canines, he/she will probably refer you back to the list of H1 blockers to provide relief for your pet's itchy [COLOR=#0000cc !important][COLOR=#0000cc !important]skin[/COLOR][/COLOR] and watery eyes.

    Claritin vs. Claritin D

    In the event that your vet has some familiarity with prescribing Claritin for dogs, there is one crucial factor you need to be aware of. The canine dosage of Claritin refers to regular Claritin, not Claritin D.
    Claritin D contains a drug known as pseudoephedrine that can be toxic to dogs, and it has the potential to kill your pet if the dosage is high enough.
    Side-Effects of Antihistamines

    Although antihistamines such as Benadryl, and in some cases Claritin, can bring your dog some much needed [COLOR=#0000cc !important][COLOR=#0000cc !important]relief[/COLOR][/COLOR], they are not without side-effects.
    These include:
    • Dry eyes
    • Dry mouth
    • Increased thirst
    • Drowsiness
    Since every dog reacts a little differently to medications, some dogs will experience these side-effects to a lesser or greater degree. If your dog appears to have a strong reaction to any antihistamine you give him refrain from administering the next dose and call your vet right away.
     
  12. Chump

    Chump Banned

    It is also used for Mange. It is a very common therapy.

    It really sounds like the dog has domedex - especially if it doesn't itch.
     
  13. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    Does this Nu- Stock shit ever dry? I just did a test spot like 30 min ago and it is still oily and kinda wet. And how long should i do it twice a day, until it is gone and his rash and fur are back? I have had him scraped once a month for six months do you guys still think Mange? I took him off a chicken and beef based raw diet and put him on California Naturals Lamb and Brown Rice., that was 8 weeks ago and no dice! I figure it could very well be environmental as we are in the woods a good 3 hours a day min, the rest of the day he is in the house sleeping it off.
     
  14. oldslowblue

    oldslowblue Big Dog

    If you've been searching for the proper canine dosage of Claritin, there's good reason why you're having difficulty finding it. Find out why this medication is seldom used in treating dogs with allergies.

    Does your dog scratch, rub and chew his body until the skin is red and irritated? Does he have runny eyes or sneeze a lot? If he does, chances are high that he suffers from some type of allergy.

    Dogs can be allergic to almost anything, including:
    • Flea saliva
    • Dust MITES
    • Pollen
    • Mold spores
    • Certain foods
    Whether the allergen is consumed or inhaled, the reaction triggered within the immune system more often than not surfaces in the SKIN. This is what dog owners have come to know as "itchy dog syndrome", but the proper name for the condition is "atopy", and it can wreak havoc on your pet.

    The reaction causes the immune system to produce a certain type of protein that automatically attaches itself to tissue mast cells in the skin. This in turn triggers a release of histamine, and it's this chemical that causes your dog to feel so itchy.
    When you have a surplus of histamine, you need an antihistamine to bring relief, and this brings us around to the question about the proper canine dosage of Claritin.

    There are several books on the market that offer information about converting human medications into canine doses. Although many dog owners have found these guides useful when treating dogs at home, there's always a certain amount of risk involved when administering drugs to your dog without your vet's supervision.
    Since there have been so many breakthroughs in treating allergies over the last several years, many of the current antihistamines are not included in these guides, and such is the case with Claritin. There are no canine conversion directions in print indicating the exact dosage of Claritin for dogs.
    So it follows that if you're determined to share your own allergy meds with your dog, the best thing you can do is run it by your vet first. If you find that your vet has had little experience using Claritin on canines, he/she will probably refer you back to the list of H1 blockers to provide relief for your pet's itchy skin and watery eyes.

    Claritin vs. Claritin D

    In the event that your vet has some familiarity with prescribing Claritin for dogs, there is one crucial factor you need to be aware of. The canine dosage of Claritin refers to regular Claritin, not Claritin D.
    Claritin D contains a drug known as pseudoephedrine that can be toxic to dogs, and it has the potential to kill your pet if the dosage is high enough.
    Side-Effects of Antihistamines

    Although antihistamines such as Benadryl, and in some cases Claritin, can bring your dog some much needed relief, they are not without side-effects.

    These include:
    • Dry eyes
    • Dry mouth
    • Increased thirst
    • Drowsiness
    Since every dog reacts a little differently to medications, some dogs will experience these side-effects to a lesser or greater degree. If your dog appears to have a strong reaction to any antihistamine you give him refrain from administering the next dose and call your vet right away.
     
  15. oldslowblue

    oldslowblue Big Dog

    if it is mange, and your sure it's not an allergic reaction, then the best thing for the hound is "used motor oil" from an automobile.;) Rub all over his body, not just infected spot incase it spreads. He will be gunky, and untouchable for about 2 weeks, but after that, and a good wash with lemon joy, his rash/mange will be gone for sure!

    ~BLUE
     
  16. Chump

    Chump Banned

    Clariton is only slightly better than placebo in humans. Zyrtec is a better choice for skin allergies. I have no clue how it is with dogs though.
     
  17. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    He was treated for sarcoptic mange with Revalution (sevamectin), i gave it every two weeks for six weeks. We did this as we figured he could be having a reaction to Frontline and it in the case we missed sarcoptic in the scrapes it would take care of it? I dont know much about dog health so all i car share is what i have been directed to do. Also i thought Mange could also be spread from dog to dog and also to humans. If that is true he has been sleeping with my other dog sharing everything and my other dog and everyone in the house is fine. I may be wrong about that as i also thought it was a genetic problem passed in the genes of the dog and a breakdown in the particular dogs immune system to fight it off so it being passed seems weird. I have however seen threads where people said i got a puppy and it ended up having mange and spreading it thru my howl yard? I asked my vet about ivermectin and she did not say not to use it but stressed how important proper dose and timing between doses was depending on what you are trying to treat. I was more talking to her at the time about worming my animals and i ended up leaving with Panacur.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2010
  18. Chump

    Chump Banned

    Sarcoptic can spread to humans, but the eggs don't live. Domodex cannot. It is much smaller dosing for sarcoptic than domedex. Dom is treated daily. 250-300 mcg/kg dog weight.
     
  19. Mr. Brownstone

    Mr. Brownstone Big Dog

    So what do you think then being he has been treated for Sarcoptic and never had a positive skin scrape for Domodex. Dont you think my other dog woulda gotten something by now? Its been six months and like 6 skin scrapes. And what is MCG? And for how many days? Not sure i am gonna take that on without a vet but? It is worth asking her if i know the proper way to treat myself and she gives me the go ahead.
     
  20. ganja

    ganja Big Dog

    has your vet actually tested him for any allergies instead of speculating on them? :confused:
     

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