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getting my puppy fixed ?

Discussion in 'Health & Nutrition' started by Mr. Bear, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. Mr. Bear

    Mr. Bear Pup

    i have a 7 1/2 month old blue pit named vinny. im gonna get him fixed but worry if i do it too soon it will prevent him from reaching his maximum height and skeletal size. does any one have any insight in to this ?
     
  2. 1916

    1916 Big Dog

    Nope,that is the best thing you can do for that dog.
     
  3. SacRedboyOwner

    SacRedboyOwner Top Dog

    Won't do a thing to his hight and size. They say it calms their DA but I got an Un-Registered Pitbull thats 15 months and he is still very DA. I got him fixed at 6 months. He does seems to mark his territory less than un-fixed males but he still ready to take any challenger. His height and size will be determined by his genetic line.
     
  4. 1916

    1916 Big Dog

    Neutering does nothing to stop aggression of any kind,its a myth,just like locking jaws. But I don't think the OP has to worry about DA.
     
  5. Mr. Bear

    Mr. Bear Pup

    i was just curious. i know in humans your testosterone and other hormones are secreted from your testies that can play a role in your physical development. im going to get him fixed i just wanted to make sure that it would be ok now insteads of waiting untill he is 12 months.
     
  6. SacRedboyOwner

    SacRedboyOwner Top Dog

    I would do it asap before he gets old enough to find a bitch and create mutts.
     
  7. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

    ur all wrong! it will stop him from reaching his full potential as far as head size and muscle tone! its a good thing ur getting him fixed but it is what it is.
     
  8. SacRedboyOwner

    SacRedboyOwner Top Dog

    Really ChDynomite, Where can I find info on this cause everything Ive read says different. You may be right but ive never heard anyone actually say its true. Incuding the Vets and pitbull books, Im not saying everything Vets say is true cause they are wrong on many things but where can I find info on that.
     
  9. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

    Some physical side effects that are possible:
    1. Hormone production stops growth. When a dog is deprived of these hormones through surgery, the dog will often grow taller and slimmer than he normally would have.
    2. In bitches, hormones are responsible for the strength of the muscles that control the flow of urine. In some spayed bitches, these muscles are no longer capable of controlling the flow, and incontinence occurs during sleep or while the dog is moving around.
    3. Physical masculine and feminine traits are “softer” or nonexistent (head types, musculature, etc).
     
  10. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

    Remember when everybody said taking estrogen did not increase breast cancer for years and years women were prescribed estrogen, because study after study said there was no increased risk in takeing the drug. Then one very large study seemed to say there was a risk and many women stopped taking it on their own even though most doctors did not stop prescribing it women stopped taking it and all the sudden for the first time in years new breast cancer was greatly reduced- even though most doctors continued to say there was no harm???....well early spaying and nuetering I believe in time will show as being harmfull, yes you must spay or nueter I am just asking you to delay it untill after your dog has grown.
    Think of it this way if you were to take a boy of 2 years of age and depribe him of his testrone would he grow healthy muscles and bone would a girl ?? hormones do lots of thing besides sex they regulate growth, muscle,moods, brain- cognitve, feelings..hormes most significantly plays a roll in bone growth and density this study says 70% more likely to get HD if spayed before 5.5 months of age! Both estrogen and testostrone build bone.. A puppy spayed young will grow taller , generally will have a narrower chest and lighter bone and a smaller more narrow head ,then their unnutered counter parts....
     
  11. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

    Finding in bold- study below- some studies I have read have said 30 Times more of a risk (increase) in bone cancer!
    On the negative side, neutering male dogs
    • if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
    common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
    • increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
    • triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    • increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
    • triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
    • quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
    • doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
    • increases the risk of orthopedic disorders (hip and elbow dysplasia) some studies say 10X!
    • increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

    On the negative side, spaying female dogs
    • if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
    common cancer in larger breeds with a poor prognosis
    • increases the risk of splenic hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 2.2 and cardiac hemangiosarcoma by
    a factor of >5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
    • triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    • increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6-2, a common health problem in dogs with many
    associated health problems
    • causes urinary “spay incontinence” in 4-20% of female dogs
    • increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
    • increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs
    spayed before puberty
    • doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract tumors
    • increases the risk of orthopedic disorders (hip and elbow dysplasia) some studies say 10X!

    • increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
     
  12. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

    Do better research, u will find out with me i eat, breath and shit dogs. When i give advice u better believe i know what im talking about.
     
  13. SacRedboyOwner

    SacRedboyOwner Top Dog

    Thats good to know. Thanks for the info.
     
  14. ChDynomite

    ChDynomite Top Dog

  15. SacRedboyOwner

    SacRedboyOwner Top Dog

    Thats a great link!
     
  16. mike36

    mike36 Pup

    I have a 9 1/2 year old amstaff that was fixed at 11 months old and he defidently devolped muscle tone till he was 2 or 3. One thing that I did notice after fixing him is his skin and fur wasn't as oiley and could go longer between baths. He didn't lose any drive and he's as DA now as he was when he was young and not fixed
     
  17. MinorThreat

    MinorThreat CH Dog

    its not even debatable doing it that young will prevent the dog from developing the way he should. Cant you keep the dog from having a litter until it reaches full maturity and do it then?

    just because its blue, people here will say fix the dog asap, theyre not worth optimal development for some reason
     
  18. mike36

    mike36 Pup

    Is it possible that a male can have a vasectomy? That way he can't produce. My dog was fixed and I always wondered if they can do that for animals
     
  19. Yeah, you can get a dog a vasectomy, but it can reverse itself same as it can with humans.
     
  20. sidonis

    sidonis Pup

     

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