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  1. #1
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    Default When should a puppy leave its mother?

    When should a puppy leave its mother and siblings. i always thought it was 8 weeks minimum but have noticed some let there pups go at 6 weeks.

    Is it ok for a dog to leave at 6 weeks and if not why?

    Just tryna get a little education for the future.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    I've never bred dogs, but I would rather get an eight-week-old puppy than a six-week-old pup. I feel like they need that extra two weeks for weaning or early socialization. I may be wrong, but that's my way of thinking.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    I would say 6-8 weeks old. I went with a freind last week to pick up a pup and the guy let it go at 5 weeks old and it has been alright. 6 weeks is when you give the second set of shots (i think) but we went ahead and gave the shot to the pup at 5 weeks old and its been alright.

  4. #4
    Saiyagin Guest

    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Usually 6-8 weeks or when ever the pups can eat solid foods.

  5. #5

    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    I don't know what the laws are were you live, but here in Florida they have to be atleast 8 weeks old. And I agree with that...

  6. #6

    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Ive always thought 6 weeks was fine

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    We've always done the 6 weeks. I never realized that there was a law in Florida(I dont live there) that made it illegal for the pup to leave before 8 weeks. Live and learn.
    J

  8. #8
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    8 weeks typically but sometimes a bit longer. Anything less can leave you with several preventable issues. Seperation anxiety and troubles socializing with other dogs and people are the major issues. People getting rid of puppies before 8 weeks are typically trying to move along so they can get another litter on the market.

    Kind Regards,

    B

  9. #9

    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Got my last 2 dogs from the breeders at 11-12 weeks. I feel that 8 weeks is a minimum. A dog taken from the mom at 6 weeks probably isn't going to die or anything like that, but its also not going to get the best benefit of socialization with the litter.

  10. Default When it is OK to take a new pup home

    I notice a lot of people are buying puppies and taking them home before they are 8 weeks old.

    MY QUESTION IS WHY????????????????????

    In some states it is even illegal to place pups under specific ages.

    First off unless there are some special circumstances involved there is no reason to take pups so young. Yes, I personally have raised pups that were younger then 8 weeks when I got them. It does make a difference

    Raising puppies is not an easy thing especially for the inexperienced add to that a pup taken too young and you often get a very frustrated new owner who sometimes ends up not being able to handle the pup.

    Often breeders who let puppies go sooner than they should have weaned them too early IMO. Others feel just because they are weaned it is OK. When in all actuality sometimes the pups really aren't completely weaned. The antibodies and nutrition in the dam's milk are very improtant for growing puppies. The time spent with the littermates and dam after that are just as important

    I'm constantly getting phone calls and e-mails on what to do when the young pups won't eat and what they should be fed and no these arenm't my pups they have come from breeders who let them go too early and then don't help the new owners when problems arise. It is more common than you probably think.

    Puppies also need to learn manners such as bite inhibition from their littermates and dam. New owners who do not do a lot of training and socialization with a pup especially one taken too young often end up with a dog that has issues such as being too mouthy with humans

    Breeders should have them wormed and with their first set of shots before you take them too.

    I know not all of you care about this next point , but I also wanted to add when looking at show quality vs pet quality, pups can not accurately be evaluated for structure until they are approximately 8 weeks

    I like to hold onto them for a couple of weeks beyond that and watch their temperaments develop more and start their training.
    Last edited by Patch O' Pits; 06-24-2006 at 09:36 AM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Quote Originally Posted by B
    8 weeks typically but sometimes a bit longer. Anything less can leave you with several preventable issues. Seperation anxiety and troubles socializing with other dogs and people are the major issues. People getting rid of puppies before 8 weeks are typically trying to move along so they can get another litter on the market.

    Kind Regards,

    B
    I agree 100%
    Every decent Vet, behavioralist, trainer, etc. will tell yuo that 8 weeks is the MINIMUM. There is a reason some states have made it a law. The reason is all social skills, not physical. It is proven fact. Your puppies may be "fine" while they are still pups, but problems arise from this lack of socialization. Help fight BSL by NOT taking puppies too early, which will result in well rounded dogs.

    I would NEVER consider a breeder of any breed who allowed puppies to go earlier than 8 weeks. It is a tell tale sign of a BYB. Pet stores don't even take pups younger, there are hard core facts supporting the reasoning behind this.

    Anyone who is in a hurry to sell tiny pups does not have the pups intentions in mind. They are in a hurry to make money, have less work to do and move on the next litter. I can understand an anxious owner wanting to take a cutie home sooner but a responsible person can wait a meesly extra 2 weeks to insure in a well rounded animal. I am completely against anyone taking a pup away from it's family any earlier than 8 weeks. If anything the pup should be older, NEVER younger.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Age to take Puppy Home






    What is the right age to take a puppy home?




    8 weeks is the minimum age pups should leave for new homes. Puppies go through five critical periods...and it's very important that they remain with their mother and littermates until 7-1/2 to 8 weeks of age.

    1. During the first 3 weeks of life puppies have next to no mental capacity and their basic needs are provided by their mother. Little or no handling by humans is required (assuming all is well with mother and puppies). But handling at this time will go a long way in development of the pups.

    2. About the 4th week puppies become aware of other living beings and have very slight trainability. This is an extremely critical period and puppies should not be removed from their mother or littermates. Introduction to humans should be started--but carefully controlled.

    3. Weeks 5 through 7 they begin socialization within the litter and also with humans. At this point they are capable of responding to voices and to recognize people. Training by their mother is in progress and they are becoming aware of the differences between human and canine socialization.

    4. During the 8th through 12 weeks puppies are removed from littermates and mother. They require human socialization, love and security. Play with children should be well supervised. They are capable of learning simple training such as Come-Sit-Stay-No. It is important that children or other animals not injure puppy -- either accidentally or maliciously. Introduction to people is important but should be closely supervised. Gradually expose to loud noises such as autos, washing machine, vacuum, etc. Puppy Kindergarten cl$#@! during this time are very important.

    5. At 13-16 weeks puppy's mental capacity is fully developed and needs experience. During this time puppy needs love, attention, socialization, discipline and security. Puppy will also try to establish itself as the dominant one. Your puppy is now capable of undergoing formal obedience training -- and can adopt a good or bad (positive or negative) attitude about training so please select your trainer with great care! Praise and reward for correct behavioral response will go a long way in training your puppy!


    It's really important for a puppy to remain with it's mother and littermates as outlined above. During this time your puppy will learn about pack heirarchy, bite inhibition and proper social behavior within the pack. Taking a puppy home before 7-1/2 to 8 weeks of age really deprives the puppy of much needed training by mom and littermates and will make your job of training much more difficult.


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    Last edited by Riptora; 06-24-2006 at 02:05 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    "

    Age to Separate from Litter

    Puppies should not be separated from their mother and littermates before 8 weeks of age. Many recommend 10 weeks minimum. This is related to physical considerations such as weaning and psychological considerations such as the puppy's readiness to leave the litter.



    Many breeders believe it is best to NOT have two puppies together. They tend to bond to each other and not to you and that can cause serious problems when it comes time to train them. Having two puppies needing housetraining at the same time can make that process go on for much longer. This implies that you would not introduce a second dog before the other six months old and properly trained. There are always exceptions, of course, and there are many happy dogs dogs that were littermates or otherwise puppies together out there. " - From K9web.com

    " RED FLAGGING A BREEDER
    You think you've finally found a breeder for that puppy you want to share your life, but you want to be sure he's a responsible breeder, so your new family member can have the best possible start in life. How will you know if he is a responsible breeder? What are the signs to watch out for? When should you take your money and run ... in the opposite direction?

    Thanks to the help of the wonderful folks on the Dog Park Forum, we've compiled quite a list of "flags" that should help you decide if the breeder you are talking is a good one or not. If you see these signs, it would be best to look elsewhere for a breeder:

    • He won't let you see the puppy's parents (the father may not always on site, this is normal).
    • He won't let you see his breeding facility.
    • He can not produce registration papers for the parents.
    • He does not have the registration papers for the current litter of puppies.
    • He has no pedigrees on either of the parents.
    • None of his puppies come with guarrantees.
    • None of his dogs have been checked for genetic diseases.
    • None of his dogs have been OFA'd.
    • None of his dogs have been CERFed.
    • He does not want to know if anything has happened to your dog (that came from him).
    • He breeds a lot of unrecognized breeds - $#@!-a-poos, Spoodles, Labradoodles and the like.
    • No veterinary health checks of the puppies from birth.
    • No mandatory spaying/neutering of pet quality animals.
    • No mandatory vaccinations (at least basic ones), no de-worming.
    • Breeding solely for "pet quality" means breeding for money - not for the betterment of anything.
    • Does not breed to better the overall conformation or working style of the breed.
    • Does not know the history of his chosen breed.
    • His dogs appear to be in ill-health.
    • He always has puppies for sale, sometimes two or three litters at a time.
    • Does not have veterinary records for at least the mother on hand.
    • His dogs have no titles, either showing, working, or sports, whatever the animals are being bred for.
    • He won't give references from owners of pups from previous litters.
    • He doesn't ask any questions about the environment you offer the pup, just wants to see the cheque (and prefers cash). The puppies are ready to go before they should be (under eight weeks of age).
    • Advertises "rare" colors, sizes, etc (such as "rare" white Dobermans, or Great Danes, "king-sized" German Shepherds, etc.)
    • Advertises or sells their pups for greatly reduced prices.
    • Sells to pet stores, puppy brokers, wholesalers, etc.
    • Breeds before the age of two.

    It is a long list, but considering the health and welfare of your newest family member, it is always better to be picky about who you buy from, than to end up with possibly insurmountable health problems a year or two later. " - From dogs.about.com

    [i]



  14. #14

    Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    i dont sell dogs much but i would never let one go before 8 weeks old,just common sense in my opinion.

  15. Default Re: When should a puppy leave its mother?

    Riptora good posting:

    We could probably even keep adding to the list of red flags with all the new crap BYBs try pulling everyday. It is really sad

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