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Update on Newfoundlands

Discussion in 'Dog Discussion' started by Institute of Canine Biology, Oct 27, 2017.

  1. By Carol Beuchat PhD
    After I published my blog post yesterday, I was alerted to an article that articulates much of what I had to say. I have appended a note to the bottom of my post, but I copy it here as well so nobody misses it.
    UPDATE (27 October 2017)

    After I published this post, I was alerted to this great article (written in 2013!) that makes the same points about the changes in the Newfoundland skull. Clearly this isn't a new issue, so what I want to know is what breeders are doing about it. If nothing, then that's a problem, because these are not changes in cosmetics but alterations of structure that have profound effects on function and health.


    [​IMG]
    Is this the "new" Newfoundland http://bit.ly/2ljWZOW​

    A short muzzle on a large, heavy-coated working breed this should be considered a genetic defect by responsible breeders with a commitment to breed for health. If breeders do not see it this way, then there needs to be some oversight by veterinarians and those well-versed in the problems produced by brachycephaly.


    What rationale do breeders offer for producing dogs with a head structure that seriously compromises the health and welfare of the animal?

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  2. great thread great breed
     

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